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christ as a companion on the way

17 And He said to them, “What are these words that you are exchanging with one another as you are walking?” And they stood still, looking sad. 18 And one of them, named Cleopas, answered and said to Him, “Are You the only one visiting Jerusalem and unaware of the things which have happened here in these days?” 19 And He said to them, “What things?” And they said to Him, “The things about Jesus the Nazarene, who was a prophet mighty in deed and word in the sight of God and all the people, 20 and how the chief priests and our rulers delivered Him up to the sentence of death, and crucified Him.  —Luke 24:17-20

He saw on the paper a picture of a man, white-skinned, who hung upon a crosspiece of wood. The man was without clothes except for a bit about his loins, and to all appearences he was dead, since his head drooped upon his shoulder and his eyes were closed above his bearded lips. Wang Lung looked at the pictured man in horror and with increasing interest.  ― Pearl S. Buck, The Good Earth

Whether it is the old lady’s fear, or the many ghostly traditions of this place, or the crucifix itself, I do not know, but I am not feeling nearly as easy in my mind as usual.  —Bram Stoker, Dracula

20130929_462_Chemin St Jacques

Crosses.  Crucifixes. Churches.  Chapels.  Shrines.  Relics.  Pèlerins can see them daily along The Chemin de St. Jacques de Compostelle.  After all the Chemin is a Christian pilgrimage route, where the pilgrims traveled on foot or horseback for a thousand years to the shrine in Spain dedicated to St. James, a disciple himself.

After Christ’s crucifixion, the followers and devotees, including St. James, scattered around the world, traveling to Jerusalem, Rome, and Puy-en-Velay, the three most prominent destinations, in order to spread the word and to pray.

The crucifixes can be seen anywhere along the Way, positioned at a town’s boundary, in churches, in gardens.  (Click on a photo to see more.)

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