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navarrenx with the first Italian-style ramparts & the outcast cagot

Let’s move on and head to Navarrenx which has the first Italian-style ramparts in France, built in the 16th century, I believe. Once it had a sizeable population of Cagot, a persecuted minority in SW France. Since 2014, the town was called to join the association Les Plus Beaux Villages de France.

But first we must leave Maslacq and walk there along minor roads and across some bridges and along some grassy tracks and over and down some hills.

DAY 33 Maslacq à Navarrenx (peut-être 22km) sur Le Chemin de Saint-Jacques-de-Compostelle.

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Early in the day’s walk one encounters the Sanctuaire de Notre-Dame de Muret. The building itself is rather new, but it does stand on the site of a 11th century sanctuary where pilgrims took refuge during their journeys. (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail.)

In La Sauvelade one can see the the church that is all that remains of a monastery founded in the 12th century. One will find the l’abbaye de Sauvelade, too.

Signs can be seen along the way. The small red bag is my Rick Steve’s day sack that I bought several years ago. It is no longer available. I believe there is another version but more modern. (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail.)

Sometimes you encounter wild and dangerous creatures who dare you to stop and take their photos. You never know what might possess them if they should look up and look in your direction. (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail.)

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Here I sit for a rest and some lunch. I am not far from Navarrenx. (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail.)

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In the distance are the Pyrénées. In a couple of days, the walk will end at the base of those mountains. St Jean-Pied-de-Port is the destination. (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail.)

Hmmm. Could these be locals who are giving me a warm welcome? But they do look a bit like pèlerins. Notice the hearty demeanor. The glass in hand. (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail.)

 

2 Comments Post a comment
  1. Jim #

    Once again, your photos are delightful Michael. When were these taken? Looks like a very pleasant journey!

    05/12/2015
    • Thanks. I walked the Chemin de St Jacques in the fall of 2013. As you can see it is taking me ‘forever’ to record each day of the journey. A couple more posts and I will be finished.

      06/12/2015

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