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on confluences of the rhône and the sâone rivers

Two major rivers, the Rhône and the Sâone, converge in Lyon at the southern tip of the Presqu’île de Lyon, the heart of Lyon.

At the intersection of the two rivers is the Musée des Confluences. I wanted to go there, but I did not plan to go inside and view the exhibits. I wanted to look at the building itself, outside, and at the lobby.

I did not know where I would eventually eat lunch, nor did I have a plan for getting to the museum, other than taking the metro to the Perrache train station. From there I assumed that I would walk.

I had selected then a tourist attraction for the day. I was hoping that a good lunch would follow, although I had my doubts, because I knew a bit about the area at the confluence, and also that something entertaining might occur while going to the museum or returning home. (I would walk, take the metro, unlock two e-scooters, and ride a bus. The e-scooters were, of course, the most fun.)

It is said that the museum was designed “to resemble a floating crystal cloud of stainless steel and glass.” When I saw it for the first time, I thought of the overly large, sleek yachts I had encountered in the ports of Antibes and Monaco.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

It is impressive. It stands alone in an area that is becoming developed. No large buildings are nearby to dwarf its appearance.

A body of water like a lake shimmers underneath. The museum seems to hover above it. The restaurant, where I ate lunch, is glassed and shown above.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

Inside where you must first pass through security the lobby is open and airy. Glass and steel dominate but the glass gives a sense of lightness.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

Several young people had gathered at the western end of the museum. They were filming a young man as he danced. Nearby, a solitary man performed for himself in the shadows. It seemed to me the group should have been filming the break dancer.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

The Brasserie des Confluences in the Musée des Confluences has a good reputation and pedigree. The menu was conceived by a collaboration between two chefs: Jean-Paul Pignol, un Meilleur Ouvrier de France and Guy Lassausaie, un Meilleur Ouvrier de France and étoilé au Guide Michelin. While the restaurant does not have a Michelin star, it has been noted in the Michelin Guide for its « cuisine de qualité ».  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

Here, I ordered a three course meal with an aperitif (a Suze): un boeuf Tataki en carpaccio for the entrée, un magret de canard, purée de patrates douces, jus court suprême d’orange et crumble de pain d’épices for the main course, and for the dessert une assiette du fromager. For the wine (not shown) it was l’accord au verre du sommelier, un Faugère « La Closeraie » Abbaye Sylva Plana 2017.

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