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on macinaggio & no need for a hike

When you walk them, the ruelles in Rogliano, the small village perché above the Mediterranean Sea, they wind and twist and dip and make you climb. As I mentioned earlier, they are narrow, and the buildings, lining them, close in and restrict you from knowing where you are.

Below Rogliano is a small coastal village with a port and marina, Macinaggio. Many small villages have layers. That is, one sees first the commercial street with restaurants and shops. If you walk into the village, away from the main street, other parallel and perpendicular lanes—maybe ruelles—emerge, and you begin to see residents and more local restaurants and cafés. Not in Macinaggio. When you walk from one end of Macinaggio to the other, you have seen the village.

The small road from Rogliano down to Macinaggio mimics the ruelles in Rogliano. They twist and turn and narrow into curves, and you cannot see if someone is approaching in your lane. The distance is only 4 km and takes about 10 minutes to drive it.

Most visitors will arrive from Bastia in the south, a little less than 40 km away. It takes about an hour to drive.

Most visitors to Macinaggio will do one of three activities: they will eat (lobster), drink (local Clos Nicrosi wines), and be merry on one of restaurant terraces along the port; or they will feel energetic and walk to the plage de Tamarone about 2 km away, and maybe eat lunch there at U Paradisu; or, thirdly, they will take a boat ride to the tip of Cap Corse and to Baracaggio and its beaches.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

At one end of the port is the tourist office, which is quite good, and at the other end is a public bathroom, which is quite good, too.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

Pastis is a favorite apéro. It can cost as little as two euros on Corsica and up to five and six euros in France. It is usually served in a clear glass, most often with ice, and with a pitcher of water. The drink is diluted with as much water as you want.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

The apéro Cap Corse is either rouge or blanc, and is more expensive, costing between three and five euros. It is produced in Bastia and is drunk straight up or with ice and with a thin slice of orange.

Lunch was à la terrace on the port at Osteria di U Portu. No hiking. No boat ride. I returned to Rogliano in a merry mood.  (Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

One Comment Post a comment
  1. OMG! That food looks delicious! It all is so picturesque! Have passed your Blog on to a friend…they will be in VSM for a month !

    15/09/2019

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