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Posts from the ‘Antibes’ Category

jetties stick out, don’t they

JETTY “a landing stage or small pier at which boats can dock or be moored; a breakwater constructed to protect or defend a harbor, stretch of coast, or riverbank.”

JETÉE « Construction formant une chaussée qui s’avance dans l’eau, destinée à protéger un port, à limiter un chenal. »

Walk from Antibes to Juan-les-Pins in the early morning or late afternoon and stroll along the board walk—la promenade—toward Golfe-Juan. Look to the Mediterranean Sea, one cannot help it, of course, and admire the many jetties that jut from the shore line.

« Ce qui m’a déterminé à publier ce livre, c’est que souvent, étant à Rome, j’ai désiré qu’il existât. Chaque article est le résultat d’une promenade, il fut écrit sur les lieux ou le soir en rentrant. » —Stendhal, Promenades dans Rome, Avertissement.

I suggest the early morning or late afternoon hours, because the sun is more pleasant then, and when the shadows contour the jetties.

« On a fait (…) des jetées de pierre, qui s’avancent fort loin dans la mer (…) » —Racine, Explication des médailles, iii.

One can, of course, stay in a hotel in Juan-les-Pins and not walk there from Antibes over the small hill. I would not recommended it though for several reasons. (I will leave it at that for the moment.)

« Je serais bien l’enfant abandonné sur la jetée partie à la haute mer, le petit valet, suivant l’allée dont le front touche le ciel. » —Arthur Rimbaud, Enfance

The bay of Golfe-Juan is broad; the shore line sweeps from Cap d’Antibes in an arc toward the town, Golfe-Juan, and there a hill stops abruptly the sweep as a road rises and heads for Cannes.

« Les deux jetées de Dunkerque qui prolongent le quai du port s’avancent loin dans la mer. Les gens de la noce occupaient toute la largeur de la jetée du nord, et ils atteignirent bientôt une petite maisonnette située à son extrémité, où veillait le maître du port. » —Jules Verne, Un hivernage dans les glaces, p. 221.

Along the beach from Cap d’Antibes to Golf-Juan are many jetties, unimpeded, free for exploration. I offer six.

(Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.)

 

dessert anyone?? ou, as-tu une ceinture abdominale !?

“Sometimes, it’s just easier to say yes to that extra snack or dessert, because frankly, it is exhausting to keep saying no. It’s exhausting to plead with our kids to eat just one more bite of vegetables.” —Michelle Obama

“If you are not feeling well, if you have not slept, chocolate will revive you. But you have no chocolate! I think of that again and again! My dear, how will you ever manage?” ―Marie de Rabutin-Chantal de Sévigné, 1626-1696

“I have never made a mistake when I asked for  a dessert.” —Michael Groves

The pâtisserie, or pastry store, is as prevalent in France as is the boulangerie, or bread store. One thinks of the Frenchman with a baguette under his arm as iconic.

I would argue that the French like desserts more than Americans. That is, the French are more inclined to order a dessert during lunch or dinner than Americans.

Many Americans will ‘grab-and-go” a lunch, and desserts do not fit well into that pattern of behavior. They might eat a slice of pizza or a hamburger for lunch, and what dessert would follow?

“Seize the moment. Remember all those women on the Titanic who waved off the dessert cart.” –Erma Bombeck

The French sit down to eat lunch and dinner and order one to three courses, one of which might be the dessert. The typical French meal consists of l’entrée and le plat principal or le plat principal and le dessert or one can order all three.

Typically, in France I order the former, l’entrée et le plat principal. I have noticed though that many French will choose the dessert, that is, they will order le plat principal et le dessert. They are more sensible.

(Click on any photo to see it larger and in more detail. Cliquez sur une vignette pour l’agrandir.) But wait, there’s more!

la passagère, a star on the côte d’azur

“Someone needs to eat in a French Michelin starred restaurant, and it might as well be me.” –Michael Groves

« Une cuisine élégante, qui met en valeur les mille et une pépites du terroir méditerranéen, une finesse et un raffinement de tous les instants, une exécution sans faille . . . On se délecte de ces créations sur la terrasse, en profitant de l’exceptionnelle vue sur la mer et l’Esterel ».

“Elegant cuisine that shows off to advantage the countless gems of the Mediterranean terroir with a consistent sense of refinement and faultless execution. The chef, Yoric Tièche, is absolutely in his element! Diners can delight in his creations on the terrace, which has an exceptional view over the sea and the Esterel.” –Guide MICHELIN 2018

Last week I made a reservation for lunch at La Passagère, a restaurant in the Hôtel Belles Rives in Juan-les-Pins, a town on the coast of the French Riviera. It was given its first Michelin star in 2018.

It was not my first experience in a starred restaurant. The occasions are rare though. The cost (let’s underline that), the recommendation to make reservations, and the need to dress well controls most decisions to eat in one.

Once settled at the table, a decision must be made whether to order an aperitif. That will be the first question posed by a waiter. I ordered une coupe de champagne, knowing that ordering champagne in an ordinary restaurant can be expensive and ordering one in a starred restaurant will be expensive.

I went into La Passagère expecting to eat well and to drink heartily. Damn the cost!

The champagne was superb. It complimented nicely the two servings of amuse-bouches I would receive before the first course. But wait, there’s more!

where will i eat today? or choosing a restaurant while visiting france

Eating well in France is important to me. Sometimes I organize my day around eating in a specific restaurant.

I live in France six months during the year, three months in Antibes, two months in Paris, and one month in Marseille. During those six months, I will eat lunch in a restaurant every day. Most of the time I will not repeat a restaurant. One can do the math. I eat in French restaurants 180 times each year.

If I am going to fly to France twice a year and spend between $1,000 and $1,500 for each ticket, I do not want to eat sandwiches or pizza or other fast foods while I am there. When I leave the apartment or hotel room in the morning, I do not want to carry a sack lunch nor do I want to eat “grab and go” meals. I want a good hot meal and I want to drink some wine. I will not become French when I am in France, but I can certainly pretend.

How does a visitor to France pick a restaurant? After all, eating in France should be an experience in itself. I suspect that most tourists choose a restaurant on the spur of the moment. If they are at Notre Dame, they will look around and choose one nearby, or select one that offers a menu that they understand, or pick a place that seems inviting or does not appear threatening.

That is a mistake. But, what should one do?

What do I NOT do?

Rarely will I rely on Yelp or TripAdvisor. (In fact I have blocked TripAdvisor on the my browser.) I am in France. Why would I take the advice of English speaking tourists, mostly Americans, when choosing a French restaurant in France?

I do sometimes make an exception. On the advice of Annie Sargent from The Join Us in France Travel Podcast, I have begun looking at Yelp reviews written in French by the French. That means typing into the search engines yelp.fr instead of yelp.com. But wait, there’s more!